Meet Anthony Peters ~ Designer and Illustrator of Some of The Fableists’ Tees

Illustrator and Designer Anthony Peters

Illustrator and Designer Anthony Peters

Anthony Peters is a UK-based illustrator and designer. He has illustrated three t-shirts for The Fableists’ launch. They will be available in limited edition soon. Anthony is represented by RARE BIRD in London.

TheFableists: Tell us a bit about your background. Where did you start? Where do you come from?

AP: I’m a council estate kid from a single parent family who got a free University Education in Fine Art and now runs a successful design and illustration business. Thanks to the way the system used to work…

My earliest creative memory is of visiting the Natural History Museum when I was 5. I got bought a fold out poster of all the dinosaurs and went home and drew them all. My mother told me I should be an artist and I guess it sank in… Though I wanted to be an archeologist before an artist!

TheFableists: What, or who, inspires your day-to-day work?

AP: I’m a Culture junkie, so inspiration comes from everywhere, old Ladybird books, Graphis annuals, record covers, music, films… But a big percentage of my inspiration comes from my family. My kids are bursting with ideas and it’s hard to compete! And many of my ideas come to me when I’m walking my dog along the East Sussex cliffs!

TheFableists: Would you say you draw everyday?

AP: I definitely make things everyday, not necessarily always with a pencil, sometimes ink, sometimes Gocco prints, screen prints but mostly stuff on the computer, sadly.

TheFableists: Where are we most likely to find your work? Is it mostly in the medium of advertising, magazine, print work or online?

AP: I’m a kind of jack-of-all-master-of-none kind of character so I have done editorial for people like GQ and New Scientist, tees for companies like 2K by Gingham, stacks of screen prints with people like Print Club London and Unlimited Editions, done some apps with School Of Happy and kids illustrations with Okido Magazine. It suits me fine to work in many different mediums as it would drive me insane to do the same thing again and again just because it was successful. I would rather try new things and fail than repeat myself and succeed.

TheFableists: What were your inspirations behind the designs you created for us?

AP: The inspirations for the designs I made come from long held beliefs I have that fit right alongside those of the Fableists.

The Factory piece is a piece of Paris 68 Student Riot style graphics given a new context. It suggests that factories shouldn’t pollute and degrade our world and that they could, in fact, be used as decent and fair working places which care about environmental concerns.

The ‘Wear Me Out’ piece is a simple statement on the fact that we seem to throw things out for the most arbitrary reasons, nothing I like more than seeing someone in a well loved and well worn item of clothing that is still going strong!

Lastly, the soldiers piece is a simple and fairly cliché statement on the fact that its better to create and share than to destroy and conquer!

TheFableists: What are your thoughts on The Fableists? Do you think there should be more people doing what we are?

AP: I feel as though so many clothing manufacturers lack transparency, and this is because their manufacturing methods are probably exploitive or environmentally damaging. It’s refreshing to see a company that has a strong moral code and ethos and puts its money where its mouth is. And so transparent from the outset!

I would love to see more companies doing this kind of thing but I fear that greed and the pursuit of ever growing profits get in the way of ethics and quality. Maybe The Fableists will have a positive influence on the children’s clothing market!

TheFableists: If you could work for anyone, who would it be? Do you have a dream client?

AP: Always a hard question for me! And it changes all the time!

In a dream it would be a collaboration with Charles and Ray Eames and Geoff Mcfetridge, Creative Direction by Paul Arden and adapted into a movie by Wes Anderson.

In the real world I would like to get into working with animators for commercials and music videos, and would like to indulge my love of music by working on sleeve art and design. Though I am teaching myself after effects so who knows, maybe I will branch out into animation myself!

TheFableists: Do you have a particular client that keeps coming back?

AP: Okido Magazine have come back time after time, and I love working with Sophie Dauvois and Maggie Li. Plus as it’s a kids magazine I get to be a hero to my kids! I also work with Print Club London a lot and Unlimited Collective, and was recently at Pick Me Up with both organisations.

TheFableists: Are there any places in the world that make you feel creative?

AP: London fills my mind with ideas and colours and energy. I worked and lived there for many years and I felt I just fed off the energy, but it can be tiresome. Now I live on the East Sussex Coast where the Downs meet the sea and this has become my geographic muse!

TheFableists: If you could change one thing about the world, what would it be?

AP: The continual pursuit of greed and power. We have been sidetracked into caring about profits, returns and low overheads. Parents are being berated for choosing to be with their children instead of working 100 hour weeks to help fight in the worldwide economic warfare; governments are calling the poor scroungers…It’s a construct, a way of squeezing down labour costs and milking even more profit out of people. People need to switch off their phones, step outside, sit on a hill in the sunshine and remember that they are here to enjoy their 80 odd years as a conscious being, not as a worker drone!

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Come and see The Fableists’ Kickstarter Campaign

We are ready to start production on our second collection. We have sampled the items and are so excited to share them with you. In order to fund the second collection, we are running a Kickstarter campaign.

Kickstarter screen grabUpon the successful completion of the campaign, we will be able to press go on our order. Our clothes take up to three months to produce, so that would mean that the next collection would be available at the end of the summer.

We have some beautiful new items, which we will be sharing with you over the coming weeks.

Please come and have a look at our Kickstarter page. We’d really love your support so that we can produce our next round of sustainable and ethically made clothes for kids. We’re on a mission to change the way that people buy clothes and we need your support.

If crowdfunding is new to you, then you should definitely check it out. It’s a really exciting way that creative businesses can fund their projects with the support of the public. Backers may come on board with a pledge for many reasons:

They may be friends or family offering a helping hand;
They could be colleagues who believe in the person looking for funding;
They can be people who share the interest in fashion and sustainability;
They could be looking for more great clothes for their kids;
They could simply like the look of what you’re doing and want to be able to say they backed you way back when;
Or, they could be backing you to get some of the rewards you are offering for different tiers of pledge.

Regardless of their reasons for coming on board, Kickstarter is an amazing and social way to raise money for your project. It’s worth coming to check it out and see how it works.

We would really appreciate your support and won’t let you down with our next collection! The designs are all really beautiful with the same attention to detail, durability, and style as the first collection. You won’t be disappointed.

Come and see us on Kickstarter.

Thanks for taking a look!

 

The Clothing Passports

justin passportsEvery item of clothing we produce comes with its own ‘passport’. This isn’t to help it cross international borders but rather to record who has owned it.

We’ve told you a bit about the passports before. They are made of recycled post-consumer paper, mixed with rhinoceros dung. They have a lovely, rough texture and we promise they do not smell of poo!justing passports 2As our t-shirts are all limited edition printings, they are issued a print number from 1 to 500. For our first run of t-shirt, the team at The Fableists have hand written the name of the artist and the print number on each passport. Talk about a personal touch! passport openInside is space to record the owners of the items, so that you can trace where the clothes have been. We can’t wait to see these filled in over time and hope they’ll come back to us with the clothes when they are finished with.

The passports are packed in with the clothes, for you to keep.tshirts in bags 2

Illustrator Greg Abbott Talks Shop as We Unveil His T-Shirt Designs

Greg Abbott's Work

Greg Abbott’s Work

Greg Abbott is an illustrator and designer currently based in West Sussex, UK. His bold characters and striking typography have previously been featured on projects for Warner Music Group, EMI and Fueled by Ramen.

Greg is represented for illustration work by YCN Talent Agency, London.

The Fableists > Have you always worked in illustration? How did you get your start?

Greg > Yes. Although I work in a number of different fields, since working full time, the majority of commission projects I have received have been related to illustration. I first started by offering web design and development services over the internet when I was in high school: I had taught myself the basics of a few code languages a few years before and enjoyed web design but didn’t have any projects to work on. At around the same time, I discovered Apple computers and since then have been an enthusiast. Subsequently I found an interest in design, typography and illustrating digitally. As I figured out and made the most of trial versions of Adobe Illustrator, Macromedia Flash and other applications, I posted the results online for fun. This eventually lead to illustration project enquiries. Until that point, I hadn’t considered that there might be interest in my illustration work. As I was interested in creative projects of all kinds, I accepted and took on all projects that I was lucky enough to be offered and given the opportunity to work on. A few years later I was receiving enough creative work to be self-employed.

The Fableists > Tell us about some of the work you’ve done that you are most proud of.

Greg > I’m quite pleased with my most recent children’s picture book, written and illustrated as a self-initiated personal project, it hasn’t been released yet. I’m normally most excited by creative projects that are outside of the areas I usually get to work in. I’m interested in a wide variety of project types and very enthusiastic to experiment in different areas. I quite like the toy design projects I have worked on as they cover a wide range of areas: from character and 3D design for the toy to net design, print design for the packaging and branding and marketing for the product.

The Fableists > Do you begin by drawing by hand? Tell us about your process.

Greg > Yes. I create and develop illustrative work by hand with the use of: a Mac, a Wacom Cintiq 12WX graphics tablet and various design software. My workflow for drawing makes use of both hands, right for drawing, and left for keyboard shortcuts. I select software based on the type or the stage of project. (e.g. Corel Painter for sketching, inking and textures; Adobe Illustrator for linework, layout and colouring). My process for drawing projects is: sketch, revise, develop and colour. For personal pieces, the sketch encompasses all of the details and establishes the composition of the design. The revision stage is for commission projects and allows client feedback to be incorporated. Once the sketch is finalised, it is developed to be a vector; at this stage the style and technique of the piece is defined and executed. Colouring is the last part of the design and makes the biggest impact. After that, if the work is for print, I create a colour-separated print ready file to be delivered to the client or printer.

The Fableists > What or who are your biggest influences?

Greg > Everything and everyone but also nothing and no one in particular.

The Fableists > Does your work have a typical look?

Greg > Yes. Whilst I have a few different collections of illustrative work (vector / pencil / inked), each collection generally shares an overall look. My personal work tends to have a friendly feel and a fairly consistent use of colour, I favour a limited and muted colour palette.

The Fableists > Do you draw every day?

Greg > No.

The Fableists > Where do you find your inspiration day to day?

Greg > Although I’m not inspired every day, when I have an idea, it’s usually the result of my imagination finding amusement or interest in something ordinary. If I hear or read a turn of phrase, or observe something noteworthy, I might enjoy it as it is and want to do something with it, or it might lead me to think about or visualise something related that I find more enjoyable and want to capture. Quite a large number of my illustrations are from things I might see in the remaining shape of a half-eaten piece of toast.

The Fableists > Is most of your work for print? Or do you do work for film/TV, online or any other media?

Greg > Yes. Most of my commissioned illustration work is for merchandise and physical products (clothing and art prints). I would love to work with film or TV but haven’t yet although I was excited to spot one of my designs on Britain’s Got Talent yesterday. When I’m not illustrating I enjoy anything else productive or creative including: user interface design, web design, coding, scripting, furniture design, editing videos, writing stories and playing instruments. In my spare time I work on personal projects and like to teach myself how to do things that take my interest.

The Fableists > Which client would you most like to collaborate with?

Greg > 

– Illustration: a children’s book publisher.
– Design: Apple.
– Furniture design: Ikea.

The Fableists > Our limited edition t-shirts will be wearable art. What do you think about seeing kids emblazoned with your work?

Greg > It’s lovely, exciting, rewarding and encouraging!

Greg Abbott's Work

Greg Abbott’s Work

The First Fableists T-Shirts Back from the Printer ~ Designed by Crispin Finn

'Made Strong to Wear Long' by Crispin Finn for www.TheFableists.com

‘Made Strong to Wear Long’ by Crispin Finn for http://www.TheFableists.com

Here are our first t-shirts, back from the printer in India! These gorgeous little numbers were designed for us by Crispin Finn, a British design duo who produce everything in red, white and blue. We love the striking simplicity of their designs. We’ll be featuring an interview with Crispin Finn soon, so watch out for that.

These tops will be printed as a limited edition run – wearable art – so once our web site is up and running, you’ll have to snap them up quickly!

We’d love to hear what you think of them.

The Fableists

Labels on the T-Shirts www.TheFableists.com

Labels on the T-Shirts http://www.TheFableists.com